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P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome

Medications for Heart Disease Click here to download and print this chart to help you understand the heart A pAtient resource guide Acute Coronary Syndrome: Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention P854_ABC_FH_ACS_Stroke_HeartAttack_Prevention_GTG.indd 1 6/14/13 2:30 PM 1. Use this chart to keep track of all your prescription medications. Write down the name of each medicine, how much you take (dose), and the time-of-day you take it. 2. Write down your over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and any other remedies you take. 3. Keep the original list at home. 4. Make a copy of this list to take with you to all of your appointments. © 2013 ABC, FH Foundation, and Krames StayWel . All rights reserved. medications you may take. A pAtient resource guide Acute Coronary Syndrome: Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention Medications for Heart Disease Many people with heart disease take the four medications described in this chart. Other common heart medications are listed on the following page. With your healthcare provider’s or cardiac rehab team’s help, check off the types of medications that have been prescribed for you. Write in the name of each. Type of Medication P854_ABC_FH_ACS_Stroke_HeartAttack_Prevention_GTG.indd 1 6/14/13 2:30 PM Medication compliance If your healthcare provider has prescribed medication for you, he or she did so for a reason. Medications are a very important part of staying healthy and preventing a heart attack or stroke. Not adhering to a medication plan can have serious consequences, so it’s important to understand the medications you’re taking and how they work. You can take several steps to ensure that any medications you take are as effective as possible. • Bring all the medications you take to each appointment with your healthcare provider and make sure your pharmacist knows all the medications you are taking. If you take any over-the-counter medications, vitamins or herbal supplements, be certain to inform both your healthcare provider and pharmacist. • If you are having trouble figuring out when to take a particular drug, discuss it with your healthcare provider or your pharmacist. • Don’t forget to tell your healthcare provider and your pharmacist about any allergies you have, so they can assess whether those allergies will interact with drugs you are taking. • If you can, have all your prescriptions filled by the same pharmacy so that the pharmacist can prevent any problems with drug interactions. Problems can occur if the pharmacist isn’t aware of other medications you are taking when he or she fills a new prescription. • If you take a number of medications, carry a list with you of all the drugs and how much you take of each one. • When you take multiple medications, always ask your doctor or pharmacist about potential drug interactions. • When you get a new prescription filled, make sure you understand how the drug should be taken and what is supposed to happen. • If you develop any new symptoms or your conditions worsen after starting a new drug, call your healthcare provider or pharmacist to discuss it. • Don’t take other people’s medicines. 29 My Medications Prescription Medications What do I take this for? How much do I take (dose)? When do I take it? With food? Other special instructions Over-the-Counter Medications What do I take this for? How much do I take (dose)? When do I take it? With food? Other special instructions Vitamins/ Other Remedies What do I take this for? How much do I take (dose)? When do I take it? With food? Other special instructions P854 MyMedications.indd 1 6/17/13 3:35 PM © 2013 ABC, FH Foundation, and Krames StayWel . All rights reserved. What it Does Possible Side Effects Notes ¨Statin Name: • Reduces the amount of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and other fats in the blood, which reduces the chance of clogged arteries. • May improve levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Upset stomach, gas, constipation, and abdominal pain or cramps; abnormal liver function; muscle soreness, pain, and weakness. Well tolerated, with few side effects. ¨ACE Inhibitor or Angiotensin Receptor Blocker (ARB) Name: • Lowers blood pressure and decreases strain on the heart. This makes it easier for the heart to pump and improves blood flow. Low blood pressure (may make you dizzy); dry cough; change in kidney function; too much potassium in the body; swelling of mouth, lips, or tongue. Dose will be increased as your body gets used to the medication. Get medical help right away if mouth, lips, or tongue becomes swollen. While on this medication, you will have lab tests to monitor potassium levels and kidney function. ¨Aspirin Name: • Helps prevent blood clots, which could block an artery. • May reduce your risk of a heart attack. Bleeding; heartburn or indigestion; ringing in the ears; sleepiness; headache. If taking other blood thinners, such as Coumadin (warfarin) or Plavix (clopidogrel), check with your doctor before using aspirin. ¨Beta-Blocker Name: • Lowers blood pressure and slows heart rate. • May strengthen the heart’s pumping action over time. Low blood pressure (may make you dizzy); low heart rate; depression; tiredness; sexual dysfunction. Heart failure symptoms may be worse at first, but will improve over time. Dose will be increased as your body gets used to the medication. Don’t stop taking this medication suddenly. Call your doctor if you have side effects. P854 Meds4HeartDisease.indd 1 6/17/13 3:36 PM My Medications Click here to download and print this chart to help you track all the medications you take. You’ve made great progress! Take a short quiz on what you’ve learned. Click here to begin…


P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome
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