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P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome

Starting an exercise program Being active can help you maintain healthy blood pressure and manage cholesterol levels. When you commit to being active, you’re not only protecting your heart, you’re helping yourself look better, feel better and have more energy. Becoming active starts with moving more. Find simple ways to make your day more active, such as light gardening or housework, or walking to a coworker’s office instead of using the phone. Walking is the easiest way to exercise. It’s an aerobic exercise that’s good for your heart, and it requires nothing more than a pair of sneakers and your own two feet. Try walking with some friends, outdoors on nice days or in a shopping mall if it’s cold or raining. Before starting a new exercise program, ask your healthcare provider about activities to try—this is especially important if you have heart disease. If you choose activities you enjoy, you’re more likely to stick with it. Try to do a total of at least 30 minutes of activity 5 days per week, or 60 to 90 minutes of activity if you’re trying to lose weight. Activities of moderate intensity include: • Using exercise or aerobics videos • Swimming laps at a local pool • Joining an exercise class or gym. Not all gyms are expensive, and some are for women only. • Playing a game with your children or grandchildren • Taking a bike ride around the block or neighborhood • Going on a hike with your family or friends 27 Getting Active Many people want to be as physically active as possible. But being active every day can be a challenge. You may find yourself making excuses or getting distracted. If so, what’s keeping you from reaching your activity goals? Use the chart below to write down your specific barriers. Then fill in ideas that can help you stay on track. Identify Your Barriers Solutions to Keep You Moving “I don’t know where to walk when it’s cold or raining.” Find out if your local shopping mall opens early for indoor walkers. Check with local schools to see if the gym or track is available for walking. “I work all day and am too tired to be active when I get home.” Take an activity break during the day. Take the stairs instead of the elevator or escalator. Park your car farther away, or ride your bicycle or walk to work. “It’s difficult for me to stick to an exercise routine.” Choose activities you like. The key to starting and sticking with an exercise program is to pick activities that you enjoy. Then choose a convenient time and place to workout. Try to make exercise a habit. Do different activities rather than relying on just one so that you don’t become bored with your routine. Finding an exercise partner may make it easier to stick to a regular schedule. If you miss an exercise session, don’t worry. Just find another way to be active that day. _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ _____________________________________ © 2013 ABC, FH Foundation, and Krames StayWel . All rights reserved. A pAtient resource guide Acute Coronary Syndrome: Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention P854_ABC_FH_ACS_Stroke_HeartAttack_Prevention_GTG.indd 1 6/14/13 2:30 PM P854 GettingActive.indd 1 6/17/13 3:37 PM Getting Active Click here to download and print this worksheet about physical activity.


P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome
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