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P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome

How is FH diagnosed? Many people with FH look and feel healthy, but because the effects of the disorder take place inside the body, it can be difficult to see the physical symptoms. The accumulation of cholesterol and subsequent narrowing or blockage of arteries is a gradual process, which might take years to be discovered. FH is suspected if there is a family history of heart disease early in life. If you or a family member suffers a heart attack before the age of 50-60, it may be due to high cholesterol. Other symptoms that less frequently appear in people with more severe forms of FH include the development of cholesterol deposits, called xanthomas, on their hands, ankles, knees and elbows. People with FH may develop orange or yellow fatty deposits called xanthelasmas underneath the eye or surrounding the eyelids. Cholesterol may also deposit in the clear outer covering (cornea) of the eye. This usually occurs in the shape of a half-moon (arcus) and can be more difficult to notice. In general, the older a person is, the more likely they are to manifest physical signs of FH. Treating physicians, unfortunately, don’t always recognize these physical symptoms as signs of FH. It is important to find a healthcare provider, such as a lipidologist or cardiologist, who specializes in treating diseases like FH. However, most individuals with FH do not show these physical signs. If you have a family history of early heart disease or death from cardiac events, as well as an LDL cholesterol level over 190 mg/dL, talk to your healthcare provider to rule out FH as the cause. In the United States it is estimated that more than 90 percent of individuals with FH have not been diagnosed. 23


P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome
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