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P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome

Your healthcare provider can do a lipoprotein profile to measure your total cholesterol. A lipoprotein profile is a blood test that’s done after you’ve fasted for 8-10 hours. It tells how much total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides are in your blood. If your total cholesterol or LDL levels are too high, or your HDL level too low, your healthcare provider may prescribe medication to help bring your cholesterol to a healthier level. If your LDL cholesterol level is over 190 mg/dL, and you have a family history of early heart disease, talk to your healthcare provider about screening for Familial Hypercholesterolemia. (See Chapter 4 for more information.) 20 Talk with your healthcare provider about how often you should have a lipoprotein profile. Wellness strategies to lower cholesterol Cholesterol-lowering good health calls for a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, skinless poultry, nonfat dairy, beans, seeds, nuts, and healthy vegetable oils like olive or canola. Your diet should restrict saturated fat, trans fat and salt. You should also cut back on sugar and refined flour, which have been linked with high triglycerides. Don’t forget the fiber Foods high in fiber make you feel full longer. This can help you control your weight. Eating foods high in soluble fiber (found in peas, beans, oats and some fruit) helps to lower your cholesterol. To add more fiber to your diet: • Eat grains, such as oatmeal, brown rice, barley and kasha (buckwheat). Choose whole-grain breads, crackers and cereals. • Include fresh vegetables and fruit in your diet. Try raw or lightly steamed vegetables. And eat whole fresh fruit with the skin. • Eat dried, cooked beans, peas and lentils instead of meat.


P854 Acute Coronary Syndrome
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